Monthly Archives: March 2004

No Vote for Eisner

My regular readers may be wondering why I’ve done so little commentating on the battle with Eisner lately. Fortunately, the stockholder’s meeting has made the national news in such a big way I’ve been blessed with some time off the subject. Pick an article, any article, and you’ll hear about how 43% of the stockholder’s did not vote for Eisner’s re-election. Roy Disney got a standing ovation, and the fight isn’t over. I’m holding to my prediction that he will be out within a year of Roy’s resignation, and there’s still plenty of time.

I’m equally relieved to see the outsourcing situation making the national news, and pleased to no end to see it brought up as a major issue during this election year. Update on that: America is still losing out, corporate America is still in denial.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter

The Bristol Board Jungle

So I’m walking through the aisles of Excalibur Comics in Portland, when I come face to face with two of my professors from the Savannah College of Art and Design. No, not browsing, but as characters on the cover of a comic book. Mark Kneece and Bob Pendarvis are two of the founding members of SCAD’s Sequential Art program; Mark teaches writing and Bob teaches… well… just about everything else. Their new book is called The Bristol Board Jungle, a reference/narrative that combines their efforts with the work of the best of their senior student talent. The Bristol Board Jungle is intended for aspiring comic book artists who need to be introduced to comics writing, inking and drawing in a classroom setting. Having been there as a part of that program, it has a touch of the eerie.

“Bristol Board” is based so close to reality that the student characters may be linkable to actual people, and the fact that all of the teachers are real offers this poser: you may have been curious about what your professors thought of the student body, but did you really want to know? Is Mark sharing a cuddly moment with his wife something you were hoping someone would draw? And what’s the point of having a transgendered goth student anyway? Since each section is drawn by a different student artist, the quality of the work varies from the terrific to the “long way to go,” every teacher in the book’s favorite critique phrase. Taking creative criticism well is the most dominant message, something every artist should learn, though its presented somewhat heavy-handidly.

None of this stops it from being a book worth buying for teenage comic book dreamers, who might as well get their rude awakening about the harsh realities of the comics world before they get to a school like SCAD. And for those who have more of an insider relationship with the college? The last page shows Bob kissing a girl while wearing his Hello Kitty costume. Buy it just for that.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter

Portland Comic Convention 2004

Sunday was the Portland Comic Convention at the convention center, and we were in attendance, passing out more flyers and enjoying the booths aplenty. What I really wanted to do was take a moment to meet Anne Timmons, the artist for the cute-as-pie comic book Go Girl! Anne’s comic style is sweet as can be, and reminds me of the Barbie comics I picked up when I was a kid (yes I occasionally read Barbie comics). Go Girl! appears to be aimed at a young female audience, and if any of you are looking for wholesome reading material for young girls, this comic is a nice alternative.

I was also in Portland to support old school friend and fellow Primal Screen alum Chris Purdin, who was having his first showing at an art walk. Chris did very well selling prints of his whimsical illustrations, and even made the local news! His wife Emily makes beautiful art object lamps, which can be seen at her Emilight website. I try to support all of my artist friends, but Chris and Emily wouldn’t have to be friends to get my endorsement, what they do is worth buying in its own right.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter