Monthly Archives: August 2004

Rob McKenna

When I started this blog I was putting up a new entry every day, but I was also working at Microsoft and bored out of my skull. Plus the strip was in its early development and there were a lot of exciting things to talk about concerning it. Now that we’re more in the grind of creating new strips, there are a lot fewer things we can give away on a whim.

The Lynden Fair was almost terrific, but bad weather ruined a lot of people’s weekend afternoon. We watched soggy dairy princesses sit in wagons being pulled through knee-deep mud by teams of draft horses, and none of them looked pleased to be there. We had our second run-in with Rob McKenna at the Republican booth, and once again I was impressed by his warmth and his sincere interest in people; he remembered meeting us a couple of weeks before and even some of the details we gave him about ourselves. A very solid candidate for Attorney General, and enough reason for me to get out and go to the September primary.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter

Minority Characters

We’ve been asked a few times why there aren’t more minority characters in Scooter and Ferret. This is a great insight into creating a strip: I was asked that recently and it really took me by surprise. The reason is the strip actually stars two minority characters. Here’s the background. When Scooter and Ferret were first worked out, they were intended for an animation series pitch. I’m a Flash artist by trade and the Scooter cartoon was an experiment to see how the characters would look animated. While we worked on that first cartoon we went ahead and recorded voice actors for Scooter and Ferret; I still have the recordings and might put them up for fun some time. The actors we recorded were really just friends of ours, and both of them were exceptionally good.

At the time we only had rough ideas of what the characters personalities would be like, and these initial voice sessions are still the basis for how Scooter and Ferret behave. The interesting part about that is both of the actors are African-American, and so I always think of Scooter and Ferret as minority characters. Of course, without the benefit of vocal inflection it’s impossible to read that from the strip. Neither of those two guys have any stereotypical traits, so I’m sure none of that ever comes across. However, until I put up some of the longer recordings, you can hear snippets of their voices in their Flash game, and if you manage to win the game their names are in the credits.

There is a black character in the works, but some other story segments have to be carried through before we can introduce him. At the moment he’s nameless, but his personality is already solidly worked out, and I hope he’ll be worth the wait.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter

Michael Medved and INTJs

Last Saturday we went to a political picnic and got the chance to meet Michael Medved. I listen to his show for three hours every day, so this was big for me. We had a nice chat with his blogger who very kindly posted us on the Medved Fan blog site. All of this got me thinking about this blog and some of the opinions that show up here occasionally, and as I get my share of angry mail based on my political viewpoints, here are some need-to-knows before you write me:

1. I am female. If you respond to the Ball Blog you will get Georgia, not Scott. Scott is shy and reserved about his politics. I am not.
2. I am an INTJ. The following concerning INTJs comes from our discussion group.
3. Be willing to back up your statements with facts — or at least some pretty sound reasoning.
4. Don’t expect me to respect you or your viewpoints just because you say so. An INTJ’s respect must be earned.
5. Be willing to concede when you are wrong. The average INTJ respects the truth over being “right.” Withdraw your erroneous comment and I will see you as a very reasonable person. Stick to erroneous comments and I will think you are an irrational idiot and treat everything you say as being questionable.
6. Try not to be repetitive. It annoys me.
7. Do not feed me a line of bull.
8. Expect debate. INTJs like to tear ideas apart for intellectual stimulation. Especially yours.
9. Do not mistake the strength of your conviction with the strength of your argument. INTJs do not need to believe in a position to argue it and argue it well. Therefore, it will take more than fervor to sway me.
10. Do not be surprised at sarcasm. I majored in it.
11. Remember that INTJs believe in workable solutions. I am extremely open-minded to possibilities, but I will quickly discard any idea that is unfeasible. INTJ open-mindedness means that I am willing to have a go at an idea by trying to pull it apart. This horrifies people who expect oohs and ahhs and reverence. This also means that I will not just accept any viewpoint that is presented to me. The bottom line is “Does it work?” – end discussion.
12. The ultimate INTJ insult to an idea is to ignore it, because that means it’s not even interesting enough to deconstruct.
13. Do not expect INTJs to actually care about how you view them. I already know that I am viewed as an arrogant jerk with a morbid sense of humor. Telling me the obvious accomplishes nothing.

Keep to the ground rules and you and I can enjoy many hours of debate, depending on how much time I can allocate to your viewpoint. Considering my schedule these days, don’t be surprised if that means I can’t answer at all, and I’m truly sorry in advance if I don’t get back to you.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter