Monthly Archives: November 2008

Get Animated

Hitting Atlanta this weekend was briefly touch and go, but the leg pain turned out to be a post-op sunburn only, so I’ve got to pack, wash the dog, stock the MP3 player and get on the road. I was mostly expecting to see my sister and get a Primerica pitch, but a note just came in from Joe about a party on Saturday featuring his band Floating Coats. I saw Joe and Jim play a few times when I lived in Atlanta and it was always pretty awesome, the big song that stands out in my mind being the theme to the Power Puff Girls. I’m sure that’s because we were all working on Power Puff Girl spots at the time. Was that really ten years ago?? A lot of the old gang is bound to be there, those that stayed in the city anyway. Raise pencils high for me guys.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter

5 Ways to Host a Successful Party

Up until two years ago, I was renting. There’s not a lot of room in an apartment for a party, and there’s not a lot of people that enjoy going to parties in an apartment as small as mine was. I bought a condo and had a couple of parties with a larger crowd, but I’ve never been able to imitate the parties held by my friends who had houses. I’ve observed that the people who held the most successful parties had some things in common, and I really admire all of them for it.

1. Have a Theme

Maureen has her Mad Hatter Party annually at the end of August. It’s called the Mad Hatter Party because everyone is required to wear a hat, the goofier the better. Clay’s annual Halloween party is 50’s themed and guests are encouraged to dress accordingly, although I don’t think I’ve ever seen anyone do that. Jason is theme-mad, and most of his parties include some type of dress-up event. Although I don’t remember the circumstances, I wore an evening gown to one and a goth-artist getup to another. Themes make your invitation memorable, because guests might actually have to take a couple of steps to be ready for it, like hitting a thrift store or gag shop.

2. Cast a Wide Net

Chris’s house parties were open to anyone who had seen a flyer. If you were a friend of a friend of Clay’s, you could come to his Halloween party. Maureen’s Mad Hatter party was a given for anyone in Cartoonists Northwest. Most of the people you invite won’t go. Open invitations are the best invitations and the surest way to avoid a low show-rate.

3. Liquor is Quicker

Clay stocked plenty of beer and encouraged others to bring theirs, plus anything else they had on hand. Maureen and Kristen never fell short on wine. And at parties sponsored by the two Jason’s, liquor was just out. Help yourself. Parties are awkward for a lot of people. If you’ve followed Rule 2, a lot of people will not know each other. Alcohol loosens talk. People don’t have to like you or even know you to come over and drink your beer.

4. Provide Food

Maureen is a master at this, and the potluck offering is probably her party’s biggest attraction. Bill’s barbecued meats satisfied a roomful of finicky comic artists. Good food leaves lasting impressions on people. Sarah has been talking about my Thanksgiving turkey for a year: if you want them to come back next year, food has lasting appeal.

5. Include Events

Chris’s parties were all about his band, but they would break up performances over the evening and give people the chance to talk. Clay’s primary attraction is his drive-in movie showings, at least two features per night projected on the big screen in his backyard, followed by trailers, shorts and a break in-between. Jason has highlighted a series of parties with drag performances he has begun practicing as early as four months ahead. Marlene parcels out the night with s’mores, sing-a-longs and starting the hot tub. Sure you can leave people to just talk and drink or night. Or you could give them something to look forward to.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter

Big TVs Make Up for Bad Legs

I haven’t posted much this week because surgery is an uncomfortable subject. So Scott’s family has this hereditary vascular problem that gradually turns into some pretty severe vericose veins. He got an ultrasound a few months ago because he’s been feeling some numbing sensations in his legs, and they said his veins are “messed up” (that’s the medical terminology, aren’t I brainy?). So they’re doing two procedures, one on each leg. On Thursday I took him to the hosital and they put him out deep, I had to take off work so I could take him home and make sure he was fed his painkillers. It’s difficult for him to walk and he’s recovering a little slower than he thought he would.

But that didn’t stop him from doing what he told himself he would do to compensate for having to have vascular surgery: get a new TV. I spent yesterday following him hobbling through Circuit City and Best Buy in the hunt for a big screen. The local Circuit City is going out of business and everything there was a mad rush, but the better price still came from Best Buy. Here it is:

46" fits nicely on the new TV stand. 46″ fits nicely on the new TV stand.

He asks me if I was excited and to be honest, not too. I didn’t realize there was so much wrong with the last one. But I have to admit now that it’s here, Lego Batman looks incredible.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter