Monthly Archives: January 2010

Apple iDon't Care

I must be the only person in America who doesn’t care what Apple is coming out with, ever. I absolutely acknowledge that Apple has driven many technologies forward and I’m grateful for that because I love innovation. But for me, everything new that is Apple comes with an unappealing caveat. iTunes rocked digital music, but that $1/download price tag… I get so much more with my Napster-to-Go service. Everyone had an iPod but it wouldn’t work with my Napster service, so my MP3 player is my constant companion. Plenty of people I know have a Mac, but for everything I need to develop for web, my PC is my right hand man. Many friends have an iPhone, but the monthly internet service charge begs the question, do I really need it right now for anything more than the novelty? And won’t an even better and less expensive competitor come along by the time I do? So I get it, Internet, you want to have Steve Job’s baby. Just leave me out of it, as usual.

I would like to briefly plug one of the first advertisers on our website just because I liked their site so much – Squishable.com. They make stuffed animals you buy for charity, but more importantly, they make knitted doughnuts. I love stuffed animal food.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter

Project Wonderful

I’ve been experimenting this week with the ad server product Project Wonderful and having a great time doing it. For anyone that isn’t familiar with this service, you may have already seen it creeping into one of your favorite websites. Signing up for a free account gives you access both to advertising on the website of other Project Wonderful users or displaying their ads on your own website. You bid through PW via a process akin to eBay, bidding on the space against other potential buyers but only paying for the current bid. It has two things going for it: you pay for a day, not for a click, and the number of websites using the service (and therefore available to you) is already significant. PW is becoming particularly common on webcomic sites, and it makes perfect sense, for what could be an easier way to bring advertisers, audiences and content together as one? When this strip first launched, offering up ad space meant creating a page on your website to let people who happen to already know about your website contact you for an agreement. Payment was clunky, probably by check. In the mail, people. PW is conveniently hooked up to your Paypal account, and any payment that might be coming to you from advertisers on your own site is dropped neatly into the same place. I’m saying this all the time now but this really is ridiculously easier than it used to be. We’ve been approved to display ads on Scooter and Ferret so if you’ve got something to promote, you could be the first!

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter

Off the Cliff

My sister graduated from SCAD with a Sequential Art degree, just as Scott did, and just as many of our favorite artist colleagues did as well. She formed an artist co-op with several of her talented friends and I’ve just finished getting most of the work done on their website, Cliffside Comics. I say most because the header is not supposed to look like that, I haven’t found the section of the CSS that controls the height of that space yet. Also I plan to spruce up some icons and I need some additional content. I’m working on the site now because when we go to Megacon we’re registered under the Cliffside banner, where we’ll be not only promoting our own comic, but also making available work from the other artists. I like the cooperative publishing house concept because it opens up our options on what we can come out with and which cons our books can go to. We have no intention of hauling ourselves out to another anime con, but Cliffside Comics has titles with an anime influence and is already scheduled to go to one this year. Besides it’s a lot more fun to exhibit with friends, and we’ll get to trade off who has to sit at the booth and who can go to a panel. Pretty nifty.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter