Monthly Archives: April 2010

Illustrator Obstacles

He’s a little “Brainy Smurf”-esque

I don’t know if it’s just me but it seems like the gradient tool and the pencil tool in Flash are harder to work with since Adobe bought Macromedia. It’s like they decided Flash wasn’t as crippled as Illustrator so they’d better level the playing field. I have noticed that Flash does a much better job of importing Illustrator than it used to, a nice benefit to the buyout, but as anyone from the digital side has experienced, there’s nothing really desirable about animating something that began it’s life in Illustrator. It’s not built to cut into parts, I typically have to reconstruct most of the design to make it workable. Anyone else seen a benefit from the merger?

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter

Hacked Off

The concept of hacking always sounds a lot cooler than the reality. Sunday when a German hacker group rerouted the DNS of several hosting companies to their website, we all got to see their incredible hacking skills. Too bad that didn’t translate to decent web design, what they were so eager to show off to half the United States turned out to be the equivalent of 1995 Geocities website about Star Trek fanzines. It took about a day to get that nastiness over with and in the meantime I had no access to the site. I’m now a little bit behind in scanning in new strips and am not pleased. Again, the reality of hacking: in the movies they’re breaking into systems to find critical information, in life, they’re displaying flashing neon gifs. Whee.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter

Comicpress Forever

Looks like Pea is less than pleased with life’s simple pleasures.

I’ve spent the past couple of night’s trying to wrap up my sister’s new website and I’ve made really good progress. There’s a whole open side bar now that’s ideal for widgets but I think I may let them play around with that. One search bar added but I’m too tired to try to guess what else they might want. I’ll probably pop the banner widget on. Their current site is a little difficult to navigate and I’ve heard it’s a real bear to update. That makes me think about all of the many Comicpress pros and cons. Comicpress is a complicated theme to customize because it’s publishing two very different blogs on the same page (your comic is a blog technically speaking) but that’s also why you need it to be complicated. That functionality is a must. When it comes to updating on a static site there is no comparison: I am writing this at 10 at night, but I won’t touch it again after I close it out. It will publish tomorrow morning right on schedule and it won’t disturb my sleep or make me late to work so I can update it at the same time every day. Comicpress really did change my life, or granted me a better night’s sleep at the least. Also, as I know the happy receivers of this new site are reading, you need to zip the comic images files in sets of about 25. Comicpress likes to upload comics in batches by uploading a zip file. Name the zip files sequentially.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter