Monthly Archives: July 2010

Two Cases to Consider

Case 1: Girl A unsubscribes to this email by clicking the link that takes her to the MailChimp unsubscribe form. Even though it’s not required, she graciously gives a reason for leaving and submits her form. MailChimp takes her off my list immediately. I hate to lose anyone of course, but when someone your stats show never opens your emails tells you she’s sorry but she might as well unsubscribe because she never bothers to open up your strip and read it, it’s understandable and totally justified that we say our farewells. I appreciate getting a reason too, any reason, just for records.

Case 2: Girl B, who also never opens the emails, spontaneously does one day. She unsubscribes and flags us her provider as spam. Well, this is really irritating for a number of reasons. Nothing you sign up for counts as spam, and there’s no one on my list that didn’t sign up (whether or not they remember doing it). MailChimp collects abuse complaints and if you rack up enough of them it hurts your ability to email. Now we don’t get enough of these complaints by any means to get banned, or that many unsubscribes to begin with. But I promise, should anyone choose to leave, submitting the form takes you off the list immediately. Not to mention how crazy it is to call something spam that’s never even tried to sell you anything. But I love you the most if you stick it out with us in the first place.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter

Where is the Brain

I had to struggle to remember what I did this weekend. My life is a stream of consciousness series of episodes, moving large furniture, unpacking boxes and throwing out until pile of stuff. I did catch Despicable Me on Friday night, which was cute, not great. The best part was the character designs, the movie just looked appealing all the way through.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter

So Long Mr. Cantankerous

I use a dappled brush in Photoshop to make the reflection on Pea’s glasses. Scott commented he’d never seen it actually used by anyone and honestly, I don’t know what else you would use it for.

News has been out for a few days about the death of Harvey Pekar but I shouldn’t let it go by without saying a few words. I admit to being one of those people who had never heard of him before American Splendor came out with Paul Giamatti, but it instantly became one of my favorite movies. I love the way the film contrasts real with portrayal, bringing in Harvey occasionally to provide his perspective on how his life was being described on screen. After all his appearances on David Letterman and the autobiographical nature of his comic, Harvey Pekar is probably better known for his grouchy personality and personal flaws than he is for his writing. But inspired by the movie, I dove into his work to make up for lost time, and discovered some of the most touching, poignant and insightful material I’ve ever read in comic form. His explorations of the male mindset are honest and brutal. The failing relationships he had with women laid blame at his own feet more often than not. Pekar showed the unpleasant side of reality and somehow managed to make it, in the end, a life worth living, because he ultimately celebrated knowing good people over financial success. There is a scene in the movie where somebody calls out to him that they saw him on Letterman, and Pekar snarls back, “So buy my comic!” I did and so should you.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter