Tag Archives: cartoonists northwest

27 Things

Once you’ve been tagged, you are supposed to write a note with 27 random things, facts, habits, or goals about you. At the end, choose 27 people to be tagged. You have to tag the person who tagged you.

(To do this, go to “notes” under tabs on your profile page, paste these instructions in the body of the note, type your 27 random things, tag 27 people (in the right hand corner of the app) then click publish.)

1. I chose to do the 27 things post sent by Jason instead of the 25 sent by Tom because Tom complained that 25 was a lot.
2. I lurk Fandom!Secrets because people revealing how much they obsess over fictional characters is hysterically funny to me.
3. My Seattle co-workers and I were close enough to talk about a lot of things that were not SFW. They know me as an expert on pervy internet subcultures, even though I myself am a part of none of them.
4. I used to own a ferret specifically because I wanted a pet that would sit on my shoulder. I was disappointed when he wouldn’t learn to stay up there.
5. At age 14 I was as obsessed with the Young Riders as any internet fan might be today, but I’m relieved that there was no internet and my childlike gushing was confined to spiral notebooks.
6. I’ve done extensive research on Lewis Carroll, visited Oxford and the vacation home in Wales, and read his diaries.
7. My first crush was at age 4 – the Professor on Gilligan’s Island. I remain an admirer.
8. One of my later crushes was Gary Owens. Yes, the voice of Space Ghost. With moustache.
9. I have never considered dating anyone younger than me. At least one year is a requirment, and frankly the larger the age gap the better.
10. I played baritone horn in high school until my senior year, when I finally got the courage to tell my parents that I’d hated band for years.
11. I got a ‘Most Talented’ nomination when I graduated from high school, which surprised me, because I didn’t think anyone at school had noticed I was an artist.
12. I once lost the regional level of an art competition to the judges’ granddaughter, whose piece was disqualified from going to state because the rules didn’t allow photocopied money pasted into the artwork. Actually nothing was supposed to be pasted on in the first place.
13. I was born in Beaumont, moved to Houston, moved to Beaumont, moved to Bellingham, moved to Beaumont, moved to Atlanta, moved to Savannah, summered in Orlando, moved to Atlanta, moved to Beaumont, moved to Seattle, then moved to Orlando.
14. My parents are selling their Beaumont house and moving to Orlando, so I will most definitely not be housing again in Beaumont.
15. I helped run a business for two years which had office space and employees on the payroll. I let my partner buy me out when I just couldn’t afford the struggle anymore.
16. My favorite game is observing strangers and making deductions about them. Extended observations shows I have a high accuracy rate.
17. If I could go back in time and tell myself one thing, it would be to avoid sugar and flour, avoiding years of pre-diabetic weight gain and fainting spells.
18. Despite distance, I will be a lifetime member of Cartoonists Northwest, and have an unusual number of acquaintances working in professional comics, from a DC Batman editor to newspaper comics writes to independents who actually do make a living at it.
19. My year working as an animator on Cartoon Network bumpers created relationships with animators that I still keep up with. I meet up with them whenever I get the chance, even though they are now all over the country.
20. I’m positive I’m married to one of the most talented artists alive. I take it for granted that every brushstroke will be genius.
21. I will karaoke on the slightest excuse, and when Jason told me he was developing an emergency karaoke list, I was very encouraging.
22. I left Georgia Tech because the pressures of Calculus III were giving me a nervous breakdown.
23. I’m writing a graphic novel about my grandfather that I think may be slightly explosive if published.
24. I think part of the fun of being a Republican is how much it ticks everybody off.
25. I watch Blade Runner at least once a year. I’ve seen it at least 30 times and regularly quote it.
26. I’ve gotten the short end of things so many times that I have little sympathy for whiny pity parties. Pick it up and try again.
27. When I would tell my father my thoughts about something, he would say, “Yeah, but is that real, or just feelings?” I live my life by that philosophy.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter

5 Ways to Host a Successful Party

Up until two years ago, I was renting. There’s not a lot of room in an apartment for a party, and there’s not a lot of people that enjoy going to parties in an apartment as small as mine was. I bought a condo and had a couple of parties with a larger crowd, but I’ve never been able to imitate the parties held by my friends who had houses. I’ve observed that the people who held the most successful parties had some things in common, and I really admire all of them for it.

1. Have a Theme

Maureen has her Mad Hatter Party annually at the end of August. It’s called the Mad Hatter Party because everyone is required to wear a hat, the goofier the better. Clay’s annual Halloween party is 50’s themed and guests are encouraged to dress accordingly, although I don’t think I’ve ever seen anyone do that. Jason is theme-mad, and most of his parties include some type of dress-up event. Although I don’t remember the circumstances, I wore an evening gown to one and a goth-artist getup to another. Themes make your invitation memorable, because guests might actually have to take a couple of steps to be ready for it, like hitting a thrift store or gag shop.

2. Cast a Wide Net

Chris’s house parties were open to anyone who had seen a flyer. If you were a friend of a friend of Clay’s, you could come to his Halloween party. Maureen’s Mad Hatter party was a given for anyone in Cartoonists Northwest. Most of the people you invite won’t go. Open invitations are the best invitations and the surest way to avoid a low show-rate.

3. Liquor is Quicker

Clay stocked plenty of beer and encouraged others to bring theirs, plus anything else they had on hand. Maureen and Kristen never fell short on wine. And at parties sponsored by the two Jason’s, liquor was just out. Help yourself. Parties are awkward for a lot of people. If you’ve followed Rule 2, a lot of people will not know each other. Alcohol loosens talk. People don’t have to like you or even know you to come over and drink your beer.

4. Provide Food

Maureen is a master at this, and the potluck offering is probably her party’s biggest attraction. Bill’s barbecued meats satisfied a roomful of finicky comic artists. Good food leaves lasting impressions on people. Sarah has been talking about my Thanksgiving turkey for a year: if you want them to come back next year, food has lasting appeal.

5. Include Events

Chris’s parties were all about his band, but they would break up performances over the evening and give people the chance to talk. Clay’s primary attraction is his drive-in movie showings, at least two features per night projected on the big screen in his backyard, followed by trailers, shorts and a break in-between. Jason has highlighted a series of parties with drag performances he has begun practicing as early as four months ahead. Marlene parcels out the night with s’mores, sing-a-longs and starting the hot tub. Sure you can leave people to just talk and drink or night. Or you could give them something to look forward to.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter

Scott the Clown

Scott Alan and his wife Guinn are coming down from Seattle this week, and that will pretty much sum up my vacation this year. That said, I’ll be posting about what we did, so you’re not getting off that easy. Scott has a side business as a professional clown, was the president of Cartoonists Northwest for most of the years I was involved in it, and is the kind of life-long friend that makes me occasionally question my decision to move to Florida. Moving here meant leaving a lot of very special people behind and that never gets easier. But I am proud to host his stay and show off the city of Orlando, which I have come to love.

Myself and Scott the Clown on a Seattle ferry. Bitcy Bitch author Roberta Gregory is on the right. Myself and Scott the Clown on a Seattle ferry. Bitcy Bitch author Roberta Gregory is on the right.

 

Scott the Clown out of costume, performing his magic act at the annual CNW Mad Hatter party. That's Last Kiss/Donal Duck author John Lustig's wife Shelogh wearing the nose. Scott the Clown out of costume, performing his magic act at the annual CNW Mad Hatter party. That’s Last Kiss/Donal Duck author John Lustig’s wife Shelogh wearing the nose.

 

Scott shows off his classic profile at the first CNW camping event. Scott shows off his classic profile at the first CNW camping event.

 

We’re picking them up at the airport today and there is a full week planned. Is it really a vacation if you’re not leaving town? It counts if you’re not at work.

Author of Strawberry Shortcake: Return of the Purple Pie Man, Disney’s Frozen Comic Collection, Transformers: Robots in Disguise Animated and Littlest Pet Shop: Open for Business. She’s written for IDW Publishing, Hasbro, Lion Forge, American Greetings and Scholastic, and her work has been discussed in Comics Beat and The Washington Post. Subscribe to the newsletter